Osprey

Found on every continent except Antarctica, osprey (Pandion haliaetus) are one of the Chesapeake's most amazing birds for a number of reasons. They migrate thousands of miles each year to and from Central and South America, mate for life, and return to the same spot year after year, despite spending the winter apart from each other.

Learn More

Update: On May 29 the remaining egg cracked open and was not viable. Tom & Audrey continue to stay together at or near the nest and have mated several times.

Osprey Cam Blog

Read about the latest news from Tom and Audrey’s nest with the Crazy Osprey Family’s blog

 

2017 Recap:

 

The Chesapeake region’s favorite osprey pair, Tom and Audrey, returned once again to their home on Kent Island, with Audrey returning on time around Mid-March. Tom decided to stay in a warmer region a little longer and finally returned to suspenseful fans by the end of the month.

After a few weeks of heavy labor nest-building, Audrey laid three eggs. Unfortunately, while fans were patiently awaiting for the eggs to hatch, crows came into the nest and destroyed and consumed two of the eggs and damaged the final one. After weeks of waiting and constant questioning of our raptor biologist colleague, Craig Koppie, it was determined the final egg was no longer fertile. A few days after this announcement Audrey removed the final egg from the nest. Tom and Audrey remained in the vicinity of the nest all summer long until they migrated south in the fall.

We here at the Chesapeake Observatory are glad to bring you another year of Tom and Audrey’s adventures, and hope you will join us again next year to once again watch one of the Chesapeake’s most fascinating and beautiful creatures. Stay tuned for the wildlife webcam to be put back up in early March!

About Osprey

Found on every continent except Antarctica, osprey (Pandion haliaetus) are one of the Chesapeake’s most amazing birds for a number of reasons. They migrate thousands of miles each year to and from Central and South America, mate for life, and return to the same spot year after year, despite spending the winter apart from each other.

After an almost 90% decline in population from 1950-1970, osprey populations have rebounded due in large part to conservation efforts and the banning of DDT. Osprey can be a valuable indicator species for monitoring the long-term health of the Chesapeake Bay because their diet consists almost entirely of fish and they are sensitive to many environmental contaminants. To make sure these magnificent Bay residents continue to thrive, we are working to ensure that river corridors remain protected and that the Chesapeake Bay can support abundant fish populations.

Additional Information

You might see ribbons on some of the sticks in Audrey’s nest. The Crazy Osprey Family puts a few sticks with ribbons tied on them in their yard each season. It’s fun to track where they wind up!

To learn more about osprey and the Bay’s other amazing creatures use our National Wildlife Refuge App, or visit one of our region’s many national and state parks and refuges to see them in the wild!

If you enjoy our Osprey Cam, please consider donating to the Chesapeake Conservancy to help us in our efforts to protect their Chesapeake habitat.

Special thanks to Skyline Technology Solutions, who has provided technical expertise and manages the video stream, Investigative Options Inc., for installing and maintaining the camera and platform, and the Shared Earth Foundation.

Please be sure to check out our peregrine falcon and great blue heron cams as well!

Learn more about osprey with our frequently asked questions and fun facts here